Blog

May 17, 2017

Davis & Floyd Joins “Rising Above Our Flooding Streets” Charleston Event

Flooded streetsIt’s no secret that each time it rains in Charleston, the streets quickly flood and locals are forced to wade through water to get to work, school, or simply around town. But what type of long-term effect does this flooding have on the area? At Davis & Floyd, that’s something we’re committed to studying so that we can create solutions to protect the area and mitigate the problem.

On May 20th, Davis & Floyd will take part in the “Rising Above Our Flooding Streets” event on King Street in Charleston. The event is being put on by Enough Pie, a nonprofit devoted to empowering Charleston’s Upper Peninsula. Artists, community leaders, and concerned citizens alike will unite to discuss the rising tides of Charleston and how we can work together to better protect this beloved city.

Davis & Floyd team members will be on hand to discuss various past and present storm drainage projects and efforts, so stop by!

Additionally, Davis & Floyd engineer Jared Bramblett has been displaying his photography series titled “Variable Boundaries”.

“‘Variable Boundaries’ is a series exploring Charleston’s complex relationship with the seas and rising waters,” says Jared. “Since its settlement, Charleston’s population has been manipulating the Lowcountry landscape through our interactions with the environment. The city was built just above sea level and it seems that the boundaries between the water and the land have never been more fragile.”

Jared began photography as a hobby several years ago. His work at Davis & Floyd has included storm drainage improvement projects in downtown Charleston. He decided to marry the two and began taking photos as part of his work.

Flooded streetsThe Davis & Floyd team is excited to take part in this important event. For more information, visit www.enoughpie.org.

To learn more about Jared’s work, check out the article in Charleston City Paper highlighting his photography series: Photographer Jared Bramblett puts Charleston’s rising tide problem into stark relief