Blog

Posted: April 2016

April 18, 2016

Q&A with Tilley Bull, PE – Vice President/Senior Transportation Engineer

 

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Q&A with Tilley Bull – Vice President/Senior Transportation Engineer

Having interned with SCDOT in the summer during college, Tilley began his career in the Roadway Design section of SCDOT headquarters. After working for over 3 years there, completing the SCDOT Training Program, and making notable contributions on the SC 60 and I-26 interchange, he moved to Charleston to continue his SCDOT work – counting being the Resident Construction Manager for North Rhett Avenue’s extension among his more impactful projects. Before joining Davis & Floyd, Tilley also had a hand in the widening of US 17 from I-526 to the Isle of Palms Connector while with another firm. That project first connected him with the Davis & Floyd team, who served as program managers and providers of the survey for the SCDOT CRM West Project. Tilley has been with Davis & Floyd for 11 years now and in his new role as vice president, he will continue to optimize road designs for increased capacity while providing community improvements and safety.

What has been the most rewarding or challenging project you have been part of?
My favorite project was designing improvements to SC 642 (Dorchester Road), Patriots Boulevard, and the Bosch Plant entrance. We were able to implement a double left turn that streamlined signal timing, improving the efficiency at which employees could leave the Bosch facility while still preserving flow on Dorchester Road. This project, combined with the three sections of Patriots Boulevard that I also designed for the Dorchester County Sales Tax Transportation Authority (DCTA) road program, had several positive articles written about saving members of the public 15 to 20 minutes a day on their commutes.

What project are you currently working on?
Currently, I am the project manager for on-call contracts with Georgetown and Charleston County Transportation Committee (CTC) programs. Those programs are rewarding because we typically are improving access to rural homes by designing and permitting improvements to roadway, designing sidewalks near schools, or adding turn lanes at intersections. I also am serving as the project manager for widening 15 miles of US 78 in Summerville, SC.

What challenges are engineers facing in the transportation sector and how has your work approached those issues?
Over the last few years, I have worked with clients that have wanted to improve roadways that they do not actually own – that certainly has been a challenge. Often the owner of the road is a client as well, so balancing the expectations of each while being mindful of the available funding is a challenge that we meet with good communication among all parties involved.

How do you see Davis & Floyd’s expertise at work outside of your 9-5 hours?
I am an avid fisherman and enjoy both inshore and offshore fishing. While exploring the rivers that lead into the Charleston Harbor, you can view area bridges from a different perspective. The vast wetlands and rivers around the Charleston area limit the options for new roadways and increase the cost of traditional roadway improvements, but that makes the Charleston area an exciting place to practice transportation engineering.

April 5, 2016

Q&A with Bryan Webb, PE, PTOE – Vice President/Traffic Discipline Leader/Senior Transportation Engineer

 

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Q&A with Bryan Webb, PE, PTOE – Vice President/Traffic Discipline Leader/Senior Transportation Engineer

After 10 years with Davis & Floyd, Bryan Webb’s expertise in transportation has allowed him to work on various projects across the state. In his new role as vice president, he will oversee engineering solutions for regional needs like growing communities and changing ridership. Bryan is a member of the Institute of Transportation Engineers and one of only 18 South Carolina-based Professional Traffic Operations Engineers. Prior to joining Davis & Floyd, he spent nearly a decade with SCDOT serving in the Bridge Construction Office and later as the District Traffic Engineer for District 6.

What has been the most rewarding or challenging project you have been part of?
I enjoyed downtown Charleston’s King Street Streetscape Project, which resulted in new sidewalks, landscaping, and streetlights along three blocks between Market and Broad. It was a complex project involving multiple disciplines, like a sidewalk redesign that would meet current ADA standards without impacting access to the existing historic buildings. We also had to consider the installation of new electrical duct-banks and water/sewer lines and, due to the poor pavement condition, resurface the existing roadway. We also installed new traffic signals with decorative poles that maintain the historic charm of the streetscape.

What project are you currently working on?
I am working on the Palmetto Commerce Interchange (PCI) project, which proposes to construct a new interchange to I-26 between Ashley Phosphate Road (exit 209) and US Hwy 78 (exit 205) in North Charleston.

What challenges are engineers facing in the transportation sector and how has your work approached those issues?
The Charleston area has seen tremendous growth in the past few years and the additional traffic has created the need for capacity improvements on existing roadways as well as new roadway connections. For the PCI project, we are performing traffic modeling/forecasts in support of the Interchange Justification Report. Our work with Charleston County on the Charleston Airport Area Traffic Impact Analysis has helped to quantify traffic needs and led to intersection capacity improvements for seven area intersections.

How do you see Davis & Floyd’s expertise at work outside of your 9-5 hours?
I enjoy seeing projects in use that I have worked on, especially something like King Street, which is part of the monthly “Second Sunday” festival. When the street is closed to traffic and becomes a pedestrian venue with outdoor dining and live music, I feel our work makes that an even better experience for locals.